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Bloomberg


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Bloomberg


Political Junkies Transforming Internet Into TV With Election-Themed Video Sites

“Internet-savvy voters are turning off their TV sets and heading online for video content that is increasingly shaping their political views. As part of a growing reliance on video-rich Web destinations for more than just entertainment, political junkies are using the Internet to view and share the speeches, debates, campaign ads and gaffes that are defining one of the most competitive presidential races in recent history.

As a result, specialized political Web sites with a .tv domain name have cropped up attempting to educate and represent a vast range of candidates, views and issues. Among them: www.election.tv…"

May 20, 2008

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The Wall Street Journal


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The Wall Street Journal


The Web-Video Factor

“Brad Belote, executive producer of KYTV in Springfield, Mo., worries the NBC affiliate won't attract much attention on Oct. 16 when it hosts a debate in the U.S. Senate race between Republican incumbent Jim Talent and Democrat Claire McCaskill. The problem: the St. Louis Cardinals are headed for the postseason. "We're a little nervous going up against a potential playoff game," he says.

But this year voters can still see the full debate even if they're watching baseball when it's aired. That's because for the first time KYTV will make a streaming version of the debate available on its Web site. "There's an appetite there for folks who want to see it when they can," Mr. Belote says….Startup sites like thepeoplechoose2006.org and election.tv are trying to create video-rich sites that provide information on races throughout the country.”

September 21, 2006

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Political Marketing: Principles and Applications


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Political Marketing: Principles and Applications


Lessons For Political Marketing

Clinton was indeed intent on being a market-oriented candidate, using market analysis to confirm her product design, adjustment, communications and campaign, and deliberately engaging in a wholesale conversation with voters. However, the changing fortunes in Clinton's support and ultimate inability to win the nomination raises questions about whether we can guarantee a market-oriented strategy will always win. In large part, it depends on the nature of the competition, and barack Obama was a strong opposer. There are other interesting sessions we can draw from Clinton's campaign: 

  1. In candidate driven elections, personal qualities are weighted heavily. Clinton had great trouble convincing voters that her experiences and policy detail were important, and she too could make change. 

  2. What works in one market at one time may not work in another at a later stage, and every trait can have both positive and negative ramifications. Although Clinton made great efforts to play her strengths and defuse problems arising from her weakness, she could not control how she was perceived. 

  3. Remaining a market-oriented candidate in the US requires thorough attentiveness to the market, because market demands and competition are constantly changing in unexpected ways, and the product and strategy need to be flexible enough to cope with this. 

Websites to visit
www.hillaryclinton.com
www.thehillaryiknow.com
www.hillaryhub.com
www.hillblazers.com
www.gloverparkgroup.com
www.pbs.research.com
http://pewresearch.org
www.election.tv
http://politics.nytimes.com/election-guide/2008/votes/index.html 

Published in 2009